Boston – Faneuil Hall: Red Auerbach statue

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Boston – Faneuil Hall: Red Auerbach statue
boston life
Image by wallyg
Arnold "Red" Auerbach took his place among the historical figures on New England on September 20, 1985–his 68th birthday–when a life sized statue of him was unveiled at Faneuil Hall Marketplace. The sculpture, dedicated by the Red Auberbach Fund–a group Red established in 1985 to promote athletic, recreational and other youth activities throughout Massachusetts–depicts the legendary coach of the Boston Celtics sitting at the end of a bench, holding rolled up booklet in one hand and a trademark cigar in the other. To the left of the bench sits a plaque that reads:

Inspirational Leader of the Boston Celtics

As an outstanding coach and General Manager he helped bring 15 World Championships to Boston. A member of the Hall of Fame, he has exceeded every record for consistent sports achievement. When measured against all standards of success, Red Auerbach stands alone for directing the Boston Celtics to more championships than any other team in any sport. He has made the name of Boston synonymous with winning.

As coach of the Celtics from 1950 to 1966, Auerbach won nine NBA titles, including eight straight from 1959 to 1966 – the longest consecutive string of championships in the history of North American professional sports. After retiring from coaching, he continued to serve as the general manager or president of the Celtics from 1966 until 1997, and again as president from 2001 until his death in 2006.

Prior to joining the Celtics, the Jewish kid from Williamsburg, Brooklyn whose nickname was derived from his fiery hair, earned his stripes as a player at George Washington University (where his season ticket seat is still colored red, contrasting with the blue of the rest of the arena), coached the Washington Capitols to two division titles in 1947 and 1949, briefly coached Duke University, and the Tri-Cities Blackhawks.

In 1980 he was named the greatest coach in the history of the NBA by the Professional Basketball Writers Association of America. He was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1979 and the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1996. He was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1969.

Boston – Faneuil Hall: Red Auerbach statue
boston life
Image by wallyg
Arnold "Red" Auerbach took his place among the historical figures on New England on September 20, 1985–his 68th birthday–when a life sized statue of him was unveiled at Faneuil Hall Marketplace. The sculpture, dedicated by the Red Auberbach Fund–a group Red established in 1985 to promote athletic, recreational and other youth activities throughout Massachusetts–depicts the legendary coach of the Boston Celtics sitting at the end of a bench, holding rolled up booklet in one hand and a trademark cigar in the other. To the left of the bench sits a plaque that reads:

Inspirational Leader of the Boston Celtics

As an outstanding coach and General Manager he helped bring 15 World Championships to Boston. A member of the Hall of Fame, he has exceeded every record for consistent sports achievement. When measured against all standards of success, Red Auerbach stands alone for directing the Boston Celtics to more championships than any other team in any sport. He has made the name of Boston synonymous with winning.

As coach of the Celtics from 1950 to 1966, Auerbach won nine NBA titles, including eight straight from 1959 to 1966 – the longest consecutive string of championships in the history of North American professional sports. After retiring from coaching, he continued to serve as the general manager or president of the Celtics from 1966 until 1997, and again as president from 2001 until his death in 2006.

Prior to joining the Celtics, the Jewish kid from Williamsburg, Brooklyn whose nickname was derived from his fiery hair, earned his stripes as a player at George Washington University (where his season ticket seat is still colored red, contrasting with the blue of the rest of the arena), coached the Washington Capitols to two division titles in 1947 and 1949, briefly coached Duke University, and the Tri-Cities Blackhawks.

In 1980 he was named the greatest coach in the history of the NBA by the Professional Basketball Writers Association of America. He was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1979 and the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1996. He was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1969.

Boston – Faneuil Hall: Red Auerbach statue
boston life
Image by wallyg
Arnold "Red" Auerbach took his place among the historical figures on New England on September 20, 1985–his 68th birthday–when a life sized statue of him was unveiled at Faneuil Hall Marketplace. The sculpture, dedicated by the Red Auberbach Fund–a group Red established in 1985 to promote athletic, recreational and other youth activities throughout Massachusetts–depicts the legendary coach of the Boston Celtics sitting at the end of a bench, holding rolled up booklet in one hand and a trademark cigar in the other. To the left of the bench sits a plaque that reads:

Inspirational Leader of the Boston Celtics

As an outstanding coach and General Manager he helped bring 15 World Championships to Boston. A member of the Hall of Fame, he has exceeded every record for consistent sports achievement. When measured against all standards of success, Red Auerbach stands alone for directing the Boston Celtics to more championships than any other team in any sport. He has made the name of Boston synonymous with winning.

As coach of the Celtics from 1950 to 1966, Auerbach won nine NBA titles, including eight straight from 1959 to 1966 – the longest consecutive string of championships in the history of North American professional sports. After retiring from coaching, he continued to serve as the general manager or president of the Celtics from 1966 until 1997, and again as president from 2001 until his death in 2006.

Prior to joining the Celtics, the Jewish kid from Williamsburg, Brooklyn whose nickname was derived from his fiery hair, earned his stripes as a player at George Washington University (where his season ticket seat is still colored red, contrasting with the blue of the rest of the arena), coached the Washington Capitols to two division titles in 1947 and 1949, briefly coached Duke University, and the Tri-Cities Blackhawks.

In 1980 he was named the greatest coach in the history of the NBA by the Professional Basketball Writers Association of America. He was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1979 and the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1996. He was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1969.

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